Sunday, September 20, 2009

18th C. Fashion Show

This is my mother, Nancy, in her 18th Century silk Pet en lair. Notice the silk hat that I just finished for her. :)

Pictures from the Fashion Show

Mom in the Silk Stays that I made her, showing her pocket hoops.

Mom putting the skirt on while Rosie wears her stays and petticoat.
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  1. Very fun! The fan pleating on the front of your mothers skirt is very interesting. I'm not sure I have seen anything like it - where did you source the idea from?

  2. I keep looking at that last picture -- the point of your mom's stays hists at her mid bust while my stays are almost in my armpit. I wonder if next time I should shorten them? Hmm.

  3. My mother's skirt is knife pleated. She followed the JP Ryan directions that came with the Pet en lair pattern. She put in the amount of fabric that it called for in the skirt, but I don't think it looks like enough to me! The small amount of fabric over the panniers is what makes it look like 'fan pleating'. I don't like it, but she didn't have time to redo the entire skirt. The panniers were also from the JP Ryan pattern, so you'd think the skirt would have enough fullness to accomodate them.

  4. How fun! I love the costumes. They're gorgeous!

  5. This is so nice! I am a reenactor (see our website, I have a question. I notice that your mother seems to be wearing her stays quite low, almost midway to under the bust. I have seen some quite high as well. Does anyone know EXACTLY what the correct positioning should be, or have advice? Sometimes mine seem to create a 'wrinkle' just above the bust under the arms and all along the gown front. It looks bad. My stays were custom made and measured as were the gowns, and fit is not the cause. I am just a little confused as to how high they should come, where exactly the scallops at the bottom should lie, etc.

  6. Hi Mary! Thanks for the lovely comments! I LOVE your website - all of your gowns are so pretty!

    I believe that my mother is wearing her stays a little low. I'm not sure exactly the proper position for the stays, but I would suggest that you check out these blogs and ask there. These ladies were both trained at Colonial Williamsburg, the first, as a mantuamaker in their historic section, and the second, as a seamstress at Colonial Williamsburg's large costume shop.

  7. Thanks so much Lindsey! I will check them out! I am glad you like our website~hope you will keep visiting us in New Hampshire, via the website! I love your blog as well, and it is bookmarked as one of my favs~
    Thanks again,